Mandarin

Grade 4
Big Ideas: Students build on their ability to describe others, including family members’ names, ages and interests. Students read, interpret and retell the AIM story of "The Three Little Pigs" to develop language strategies, such as using cognates, context clues and opposites. There is a focus on interaction and on answering basic questions (who, what, when, where) about Mandarin holidays and traditions, and students develop a curiosity and respect for Chinese culture, including traditions such as Moon Festival, Chinese New Year and Chinese Dragon Boat Festival. 

Grade 5 
Big Ideas: Students continue to explore and develop a respect and curiosity for Mandarin culture. They read an increasingly complex story, "The Cat and Moon," and focus on retelling, asking and answering questions about the story. There is a focus on interaction and on answering basic questions (who, what, when, where) about Mandarin holidays and traditions. 

Grade 6 
Big Ideas: Students focus on describing their and others' daily routines, learn to use reflexive verbs and learn to tell time. They read an increasingly complex story, "How Can I Get There?", retelling, asking and answering questions about the story, which incorporates speaking, reading, writing and listening, and builds on skills and vocabulary learned in previous levels. There is a focus on interaction and on answering basic questions (who, what, when, where) about Mandarin holidays and traditions.

Grade 7 
Big Ideas: Students learn Mandarin through the Accelerated Integrative Method (AIM) story of "The Little Dog." AIM, which uses gestures to help communicate the meaning of high-frequency words, allows students to engage and to learn the language in context through a level-appropriate play. It incorporates speaking, reading, writing and listening, with each play building on skills and vocabulary learned in previous levels. There is a focus on interaction and on answering basic questions (who, what, when, where) about Mandarin holidays and traditions.
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